Posts Tagged ‘New Media’

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Marketing Strategy: Comparethemeerkat.com

May 14, 2009

Alexander Mikhailovich Orlov was a Soviet espionage administrator, who defected to the U.S. in 1938, warned Leon Trotsky of his impending assassination (read more here). Nevertheless, for the last four months “Aleksandr Orlov” the meerkat with a Russian accent broadcasts on TV in order to reassure people that they should not get confused between the two pages; comparethemarket.com and comparethemeerkat.com. He explains that lately many people have been misspelling the words when looking for price-comparison site Compare The Market in search engines and landing on his page Compare The Meerkat when trying to find a cheap car insurance. If you have not seen the TV ad yet, please see it yourself:

I remember seeing that clip for the first time and wondering a little about its sense. However, despite some doubts the ad caught my attention as well as the attention of many others. Being curious I went to investigate a bit to find out more myself. Compare The Market is a price-comparison website, which aims to provide its customers with the most beneficial and cheapest quotes from various major organisations offering car, travel or home insurances; credit cards; mortgages; loans etc. Some examples of such organisations include The AA, HSBC, Nationwide and the Post Office. Compare The Meerkat is a site founded by the Russian meerkat entrepreneur Alexandr, who claims to be a member of the Russian aristocracy and lives in Moscow. His site provides information about various meerkats, their origins, hobbies and favourite activities. A month later another clip appears, where he claims that there is a big difference between his page, comparethemeerkat.com and the price-comparison site comparethemarket.com, by playing both jingles that sound pretty much identical.

Aleksandr Orlov's Twitter Page

Aleksandr Orlov's Twitter Page

After getting lots of positive response and people liking these adverts, Aleksander did not rest on his laurels. He created an account on social networking site Twitter gaining great response within only a few days and currently has 14,935 followers (see his page here). Hence, Aleksandr took advantage craftily of the numerous branding and social networking opportunities delivered by Twitter.

Matching his character his account provides funny and light-hearted content, which is also adding value through a personal touch to the brand itself as well as and additional level of online customer support. According to Revolutionmagazine Aleksandr even encouraged his Twitter followers to leave statements on how they like the business in order to create a testimonial area on Comparethemeerkat.com with their comments and photographs (read full story here).

Aleksandr also has created a Facebook page (here you can see his profile) with stunning 409,565 “fans” where he similarly to Twitter discusses funny stories and jokes with people who have signed up for him.

Aleksandr Orlov on Facebook

Aleksandr Orlov on Facebook

Both, Twitter and Facebook show high potential for customer interaction and also very high response rate from people involved. In marketing terms that can be seen as brand management and reputation building from a funny and relaxed perspective: people start to like Aleksandr and part of their affection will be transformed to Compare The Market eventually. Moreover, there is also a profile on YouTube (see here) where people have signed up as followers and leave comments on the videos. It seems that people are highly enthusiastic in communicating with Aleksandr. On all pages high interaction between customers and “Aleksandr” is apparent, which represents an essential element for successful social networking.

With reference to George Everett, the creator of the campaign states in Marketing Magazine:

“Facebook and Twitter are fantastic media for us as they allow us to build a conversation with consumers,’ he says. ‘People only insure their cars once a year but we will be at the front of mind.”

Only recently a new character has been introduced “Sergej” the one who is responsible for IT and seems to be an important part within Aleksandr’s company – and also gives the brand another mascot. His appearance gains greater importance and he has even received a role in the newest clip, that came out two weeks ago:

Compare The Market have created a spoof on their own name and perfectly combined online with offline efforts within their marketing concept by combining above-the-line advertisement such as print, TV and radio with below-the-line advertisement such as social networks and web pages. This shows that new media are even stronger if combined with traditional methods, if applied effectively so that one can boost the other in the most efficient way.

With reference to Marketingmagazine the responsible agency VCCP had the clear brief to boost the brand name “Compare The Market” in order to generate brand awareness and to stand out in a very crowded market. Hence, return on investment has been achieved clearly as brand recall is ensured massively – I am sure that people will definitely remember the brand, as VCCP have done a great job.

In SEO terms, which is the concept of optimising the ability of others to find your brand’s online appearance best possible when using a web search engine such as Google or Yahoo, Compare The Market have also succeeded. Having an account on the most popular social networks boosts a brand in extremely high positions on web search engines. By building brand awareness via social media, this also allows them to have a direct influence towards increasing online traffic and finally their sales.

This entire campaign is a brilliant piece achieving a viral effect that does not seem to stop spreading. Definitely an outbreak in promotion by combining online and offline efforts. It shows how successful a clear marketing strategy can be, when created properly by applying currently popular tools. They took advantage of the popularity of social networking sites Facebook, Twitter and YouTube in order to build a platform for interaction with their “fans”. I am sure some people may argue whether having lots of followers supports their business, but once more I believe that awareness creation, which is achieved perfectly in this case, has a long-lasting effect that will stay in mind. And if you ever should require cheap car insurance… I am sure you will remember Aleksandr and give their page a go – if this is not successful marketing, then please tell me why!

And because its so nice…here some more of Aleksandr!

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Rising from the Ashes? – Woolworths goes Online

April 11, 2009

The recession hit many businesses hard, even long established brand Woolworths, Britain’s major retailer, suffered massively and was forced into receivership and finally went into liquidation.

woolworths shut store

The high-street chain collapsed in November 2008, only one year before its centenary. Founded by Franklin Winfield Woolworth in 1909, Woolworths established into a 800 chain giant. Right from the start selling a variety of merchandise such as toys, sweets, children’s clothing and haberdashery. Thanks to mass production “Woolies” was able to be very price competitive and that is how they outperformed many British competitors when it came to china and glassware. According to Lavan from The Times Online,  in their first year of trade in Britain they offered free pots of tea to customers and introduced new shopping experiences through an American store layout encouraging to browse around (read more here).

woolworths-sheep-and-dog

But competing on price only is a risky game. Referring to the BBC , the main problems arose when it was heavily undermined by Amazon and large supermarkets like Tesco started selling non-food products (full story here).

Generations of shoppers commiserated with the sinking ship of Woolworths, a brand the grew up with, liked and trusted. A high amount of affection was shown when the brand’s followers on social networking sites started to increase when the recession started to kick in and Woolworths’ breakdown was covered all over the media. Referring to Marketingmagazine, Woolworth’s group on Facebook has rapidly increased exceeding a number of 23,000 members showing sympathy and sharing affection.

Whilst some were going under, investors caught interest and started to see potential business opportunities. A famous example is entrepreneur Theo Paphitis, who successfully turned around struggling and troubled retail businesses, such as the one of lingerie chain La Senza, which was one of his biggest successes (more). He is also known from the popular BBC programme “Dragons Den“, where according to BBC his focus belongs to the inheritance of his children and he is known for the sentence: “Why should I part with any of my children’s inheritance investing in this?”

woolworths-theo-paphitis

Finally, the company was bought by the Shop Direct Group and Woolworths’ are now back with a new customer focused and very interactive online strategy.  Shop Direct Group the result of a merger between Shop Direct companies and Littlewoods in 2005 is one of the UK’s largest online retailers. Despite Woolworths’ popularity critics were arguing that Woolies were “out-of-touch”, lacking customer focus, as well as interaction. With reference to Manning from the Mirror, Woolies had no real unique selling point: “It is a jack of all trades, but a master of none”.  He also refers to it as outdated in an era where online shopping is outperforming shopping in giant out-of-town centres (read more).

This shall all be changed with the new business model and a vibrant marketing strategy. Shop Direct Group’s new strategy is to reduce Woolworths’ operations on only online with a strong focus on customer information and involvement through interaction. Woolworths has been relaunched online with a very strong web presence.

Shop Direct Group, which is preparing for Woolworths’ relaunch in the upcoming summer is certainly doing a good job and improving main weaknesses. It seems like they have recognised the power and opportunities that lie in online social networks. As a sign of high interaction with customer they are collecting feedback and areas of interest through social network pages Facebook, Twitter, Spotify and last fm. They set up groups called “the first single I ever bought” and encourage users to list their experiences and create a “nostalgic playlist”. Marketingmagazine states that well renounced agencies Glue London and The Brooklyn Brothers have been appointed for Woolworths’ social media presence and engagement. In order to keep customers up to date with newest information they regularly put information on Twitter, Facebook or their newly created blog (www.woolworthsblog.co.uk). This move enables them to be much more transparent and automatically provides Woolworths with more closeness to its “followers” and their feedback. A great way for their online reputation management as well as a source for ideas or concerns from interested individuals.

On Twitter they recently tested if there is any demand for some of their new offerings and according to Marketingmagazine, Twitter followers were prompted to list their top five Woolworths’ products – a great way to conduct market research in order to detect customer’s favourites (Read more).

Moreover they have created a page specially for Easter (www.woolieswonderland.co.uk) – a page that encourages its visitors to find six virtual eggs in order to secure a place in a prize draw to win a family home entertainment system…and of course to drive web traffic and collect contacts, but don’t tell anyone 😀

woolieswunderland

All in all it seems that Woolworths is on the right course. By applying clever and strategic marketing techniques and using appropriate new media tools, they can reach their audience, engage with them and discover what are the right steps to do next in order to have a successful comeback as an online store.

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First Direct – A Fully Customer-Oriented Business Model

April 1, 2009

First Direct, one of Britain’s fastest growing banks, operate solely on a digital and phone basis (no branches) have managed to create a very impressive business model making use of new media and new technologies.

logo first direct

logo first direct

In banking, with reference to a Mintel report, there is a tendency towards customised and simplified business transactions, First Direct appears to be a simple and transparent service provider with a focus on its customers and with customer driven operations. It ticks all the boxes, of how a successful organisation should operate. Through brand differentiation, and as all their services are entirely built around customer needs. they have created something their customers can identify with. Marketing Strategist David Meerman Scott would approve of this, as he stresses the importance of creating content that solves people’s problems, rather than trying to promote the brand.

He states: You must unlearn the use of gobbledygook about your products and services. Instead start from the problems and needs of your buyer personas. (Read the full article here)

First Direct won several awards related to their operations such as: “Carbon Trust Standard” (They were the first bank to receive the Carbon Trust Standard award. More info), “Institute of Customer Services (ICS) Satisfaction Award“, “DADI podcast award” and many more. Not only that these awards improve First Direct’s brand reputation, but they certainly led also to positive publicity and word-of-mouth.

There are a two aspects I would like to consider a bit closer that give insight into First Direct’s business excellence.

Online / Telephone Banking

The benefit of operating online or via call centres is that every customer contact data is recorded and helps to develop a customer profile. This increases the quality of service as every employee servicing a customer has a wide range of technology available that provides full information about the person during the contact and thus, allows the  best possible service performance. Hence, there is opportunity for perfectly tailored database marketing to the customers. Moreover First Direct can make use of these data to learn more about their customers, make decisions about target markets for specific campaigns (customer segmentation), evaluate and compare customer values and finally, provide specialised offers for customers. Database marketing is invaluable, as it allows First Direct to create exceptionally tailored offers and services in a market based upon trust and confidence.

Telephone and Online banking can be perceived as a move towards a greener economy that supports the carbon footprint reduction. Having branches all over the country is related to high maintenance costs. In the case of First Direct these costs are limited to two headquarters and therefore the funds can be invested in consistent improvement of services, quality and technology. Besides,without the overhead of managing and maintaining branches First Direct are able to channel more resources into web development.

Interaction

First Direct make perfect use of their web page, a very fresh, creative and interactive offering – atypical for a bank in my opinion. The webpage provides podcasts with recent queries, concerns and expert information about interesting issues for their consumers (check it out). Moreover, one can find useful information about how to save energy at home. One podcast by “Energy Doctor” Mark London from “Energy Saving Trust“gives specific advice for energy savings in every household, by visiting a customer’s house (listen to the advice here). Not only are they are anxious to keep their own carbon footprint low, they also motivate their customers to take part as well as promote and encourage them to turn off the function of receiving paper bank statements in order to support their campaign “virtual forrest“. First Direct claim to plant one tree per 20 customers who switch onto paper-free transactions and let people vote where the tree should be planted. Another interesting approach is that they provide a section called “enthuse” with video clips of customers, who tell you their personal experiences with the bank and the reason why they are satisfied. These people can be seen as so called “brand advocates”, as they promote the bank by spreading their favourable perceptions and thereby generate greater brand awareness. It’s more credibe when someone like you and me gives you advice, rather than a brand trying to promote itself. This is supported by several consumer behaviour studies which identified higher confidence from consumers in personal recommendations amongst acquaintances than in advertisements.

These examples show how much more one can do with the help of new media tools, and how much more a customer may expect from a simple bank website. And as their side wouldn’t be already much more advanced that the ones from other banks, First Direct have only recently introduced a new tool: the little black book. This serves in form of a social network that is based on recommendations from First Direct customers to First Direct customers, where they can exchange information about travel, restaurants, bars, shops, services, money-saving tips etc. A great idea considering that a third of First Direct’s customers join via recommendations from existing customers, as stated in Chris Laweer’s article on FutureLab. First Direct state:

As first direct customers, you’ll know by now that we’re not like other banks. We tend to do things a little differently. We know you appreciate that – and that’s precisely why we wanted to create the Little Black Book.

Or rather, why we want you to create it. Because the Little Black Book isn’t just another review site. It’s more of a unique source of inspiration – a collection of interesting recommendations made by people like you for people like you that you’re unlikely to find anywhere else but here. And it’s exclusively for first direct customers.

A very smart move to engage with their customers! Not only did they build a social network for and with their customers, but also they gain further insight into interests and specific data about their customer. This in turn, will allow First Direct to create even better and more tailored offers for their customers. Imagine Mr X will show as being very proactive and keeps posting reviews of British heritage tours he’s made. First Direct needs some sort of reward for this customer. That they can tailor an offer, fully based on personal interests, in Mr X’s case probably a short trip to a place of interest – or even better, one that matches his interests, but it is not recorded that he has been there yet!

It appears that First Direct spends more time and effort in getting to know their customers in order to provide them with the expected services and added value. In essence, it excites me to think how great marketing opportunities must arise from all the customer data First Direct has access to. Unfortunately I don’t know anyone who is banking with them, and have no personal experience, so I cannot add any personal judgement. However, my impression stays the same. First Direct have created a very impressive business model, that seems to be a cutting-edge example for the creative and successfully implemented use of technology and new media means!

In that context, based on another statement from David Meerman Scott that says:“You must unlearn the idea that “leads” are the only way to measure your marketing efforts. Instead, consider how you are engaging your buyers and building a position as a trusted resource”, he may compliment First Direct’s efforts once more, as that is exactly what they are doing.

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SEO vs. PR – A Valid Judgement?

March 17, 2009

The increased importance of the Internet, and hence new media, may make brands believe that having a substantial online exposure is “the one and only” marketing communications tool of the future to which they can entirely delegate this function and ensure their brand reputation flow. Classical marketing tools such as Public Relations (PR) are suffering as a result of being questioned regarding their relevance in a time where every individual can speak out and be heard by the rest of the world. Search Engine Optimisation (SEO) experts that promote their service of focusing on increased online exposure are giving PR a hard time. Many brands believe that being well presented online with high page ranks and a lot of hits on Google (“Increase your Google hits” by Ron Castle) can replace PR services entirely.

Given the increasing online competition and rising power of new media, the idea of placing the main focus on online campaigns is very tempting. SEO agencies specialise in increasing the level of online exposure using systematic keyword and metadata management, they promote themselves as a way for brands to ensure high page rank and search engine position. Nevertheless, they are lacking the ability to offer “reputation management” and cannot fully replace the role of a PR agency. Globally, the use of the Internet and social networks has increased rapidly, which has offered many opportunities for individuals and brands to have a “public voice”. Even if the role of PR has been challenged by the Internet offering great opportunities to “do it yourself” its importance should not be underestimated. Core tasks of PR such as reputation management, strategic counsel, expertise and increase in media exposure cannot simply be excluded.

Comparing the people behind the services, PR and SEO are two very different dimensions. Whilst SEO specialists have high technical skills and interests, their job consists of HTML generation, page content formatting, systematic keyword selection and implementation, metadata management and page linkage to relevant online resources. In contrast, PR people have rather linguistic skills along with research interests; their business is in understanding the industries and environments their clients operate in order to provide them with strategic reputation management and advice through a network of relevant contacts. Also from an academic perspective it would be different study programs; PR/Marketing for the ones and IT for the others.

Moreover SEO and PR pursue two completely different objectives: whilst SEO aims to create long term traffic, PR in addition to long term traffic, is also concerned with short term traffic. Another aspect is the difference of their operation areas: SEO influences online exposure only and PR concerns on- and offline traffic.

So why is there this ongoing discussion about SEO vs. PR?

As David Meerman Scott points out, keywords alone cannot substitute for good content, which supports the fact that the skills of PR people are required. He also stresses that brands should create content that its target customers or as he calls it buyer personas are interested in – it has to solve their problems, rather than promote services or create content around beneficial key phrases. “For ranking in Google, however, the main benefit of a press release is not direct links or page rank from the press release directly; it is primarily the people who decide to write an article and create links to the product or brand because of the press release (Matt Cutts, head of Google’s WebSpam team, 2005), which also implies that people must like your content in order to link to it.

Unity is Strength

PR and SEO

PR and SEO - unity is strength

SEO should not be considered as a direct competitor of PR, but rather as a tool that PR must apply, in order to flourish online.

Successful online campaigns should always be backed up by offline strategies to achieve cohesive reputation control. All in all these are marketing communications that should be part of an ongoing marketing strategy. I found that picture in a post by Emmanuel Idé, who also shares the opinion about combining PR and SEO that serves as perfect illustration and modified it a little.

Combined these two can maximise ROI factors and secure both the push and the pull effects of marketing communications. Having a balance of push, pull and profile strategies is also recommended by academic literature (e.g. Chris Fill – Marketing Communications). Finally, is consideration of the statement by Phil Dennison, senior marketing specialist of Business Wire: “Make sure name and brand are in the right place at the right time when people are looking for them.” (Read the full story here)

Many organisations are already doing it, and an excellent presentation is delivered by Common Craft:

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ROI for BlendTec’s “Will it Blend?” Campaign

March 13, 2009
blendtec-total-blender1

"Total Blender" by BlendTec

In one of my previous blog entries some successful viral campaigns have been discussed and readers have shown scepticism about return on investment factors. This encouraged me to investigate a little further into the ROI factors of “Will it blend?” that represents a superb campaign which prospered massively.

“Will It Blend?” started as trial viral marketing campaign consisting of a series of commercial shows demonstrating BlendTec’s product the “Total Blender”.

BlendTec founder and CEO Tom Dickson grinds an unbelievable range of items in order to demonstrate the power of his product.

The idea came from George Wright, BlendTec’s vice president of marketing, who got excited about Tom Dickinsin’s extraordinary testing methods in order to assure the quality of his products.

“…The way he tests equipment is very extreme. And he does a lot of crazy things and this blender did a lot of amazing things under this destructive testing. My first thought was, you know I would like to see that happen the next time he does it. And then I kept thinking you know what? I bet everyone else would like to see that happen too, this is amazing staff – and so we did!…” (Hear the full interview with George Wright provided by Rocky Mountain Voices here or at PodTech)

They set up an account with the popular video sharing side YouTube on the 30th of October 2006 and currently have 172 658 subscribers, 3 270 602 channel views and 83 different video clips (see here). With the slogan: “See what the Total Blender can do in the BlendTec test lab, as we ask the question, Will It Blend?” they also encourage viewers to submit ideas of what they would like to see being blend.

According to an article by Information Week, George Wright, BlendTec’s vice president of marketing said that BlendTec suffered a lack of brand awareness, even being in the business producing commercial blenders for years. Operating in the B2B sector mainly, BlendTec introduced its blenders for the B2C market, but could not afford “tens of thousands for a marketing campaign” for a traditional above-the-line advertising campaign.

Wright states in the interview with Rocky Mountain Voices that social media such as blogs and the video sharing site YouTube, combined with the technology offered his company a great opportunity for more branding.  By aligning with the right social networks and some leading blogs within five days the campaing had a massive break through.

With reference to Econsultancy BlendTec’s site traffic has increased by 650% since the videos have been introduced. Both, Information Week and Econsultancy report that BlendTect’s sales have increased five-fold over previous record revenues. Additional revenue was generated through the ad-share program with video sharing network Reever.

This campaign enabled BlendTec an incredible media outreach and PR buzz which happened through third party endorsement and was not a prescribed expensive advertisement campaign. Of course not every viewer ends up becoming a new customer, but the campaign represents a breakthrough in demographics for BlendTech’s brand awareness and image creation.

A great example for the immense power of new media and social networks. Finally, the breakthrough of this campaign required a good idea, material for about $50.- and some hours of recording and testing – nothing in comparison with the costs of normal advertising campaigns!

Tom Dickson is my homeboy

Tom Dickson is my homeboy

UPDATE:

Thanks to George Wright I am able to update this post with some further information. I have asked him about offline effort related to the online campaign, as literature strongly recommends to have a combination of both online and offline promotion. He responded that is has been primarily an online campaign with only a few exceptions when it comes to traditional marketing efforts:

  1. we included http://www.willitblend.com on our packaging of our retail products
  2. we have hosted live blending performances at trade shows and corporate events
  3. we did have a billboard that we had made that is on the side of our building… proudly showing Tom blending a rake

It may appear like little efforts, but to me these were essential steps that needed to be done. Moreover a campaign that is covered online and offline receives higher degree of credibility and potential customer may perceive it as being “in reach”.

Step one shows additional awareness creation and increases traffic to their webpage. Besides that, it connects existing customers to fans or admirers of the campaign. Happy customers can turn into brand advocates, defend the brand from negative criticism or convince sceptics with their personal experience with the brand. They encourage passion and excitement which strengthens the online campaign and spreads positive word-of-mouth.

Step two serves similar principles like step two, as individuals got the chance to be part of a live “Will it blend?” showcase, which must have generated excitement, convinced sceptics and increased the desire: I must tell this story to people I know! Seeing the performance online is already pretty impressive, now imagine the impact if all that happens right in front of you. Event if I probably would not buy one of these blenders (they are pretty costly), I would definitely tell to people that I’ve seen it happen and that all is real… Some of my friends would then pass the message to others and spread the word that they know someone who has seen it and so one… And, a few links later probably someone will then defend the “Will it blend?”  campaign online by saying: no, it’s not fake, I know someone who has seen all that happen live – it’s all true. And if it all works ideally and any of my friends who runs a bar or restaurant should require a new blender I may recommend BlendTec!

Step three is probably the least effective method for brand awareness creation. People who live close or drive by notice the billboard. Hence, awareness creation happens within a geographically restricted area. Nevertheless, the word can still be spread wider. Besides that, I see other benefits from that move. By placing a billboard on their building BlendTec’s employees may have enhanced their personal feeling of commitment and pride towards the organisation. Having happy, committed and motivated employees is a remarkable part that adds to an organisation’s competitive advantage.

The more I learnd about BlendTec’s campaing the more impressed I am from what they have achieved! A prime example of a successful viral campaign that definitely deserves to be mentioned in future viral marketing literature!

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Nespresso, What Else?

March 8, 2009

nespresso
Having a Nespresso machine is one thing, but getting some capsules another! After researching online I was lead to believe that there are several retailers where you can by machines and capsules – but no, you can buy only machines. Unless you live in London and buy at Harrods.

Nestlé Nespresso SA, a subdivision of Nestlé Group, is an exclusive and premium coffee brand that provides copyright protected single-serving “capsules” containing ground coffee. nespresso_capsules1They also approach several appliances manufacturers such as Siemens, De’Longhi, Miele, Krups and Magimix to build top-quality machines and stylish accessories promoting their brand and coffee, which exclusively run with Nespresso branded capsules. They also apporach brands like Alessi to design exclusive branded espresso tableware for them.

nespresso-machines

The coffee industry is a highly competitive market with rivals all over the globe and after oil; it has become the second most targeted product worldwide. Given the stiff competition and the current economic downturn, many suppliers struggle to sustain their businesses. Nevertheless, organisations that are providing exclusive and high quality coffee (AA ranking) appear to gain a secure position.

In 2003 Nespresso introduced the NESPRESSO AAA SUSTAINABLE QUALITYTM with an additional “A”, which stands for their assurance and commitment to consistent excellence “from the coffee tree to the coffee cup” and their highly respectful fair trade conditions in coffee production countries.

Nespresso is located in Paudex, Switzerland and employs approximately 2,500 staff worldwide. Its machines are sold globally through retail channels, while the capsules are sold exclusively through their webpage with the exception of 175 premium coffee boutiques. These boutiques are located in the following markets (Source: Nestlé Nespresso SA Corporate Communications):

  • Argentina: Buenos Aires
  • Australia: Sydney
  • Austria: Vienna (2), Linz, Salzburg, Graz
  • Belgium: Antwerp, Brussels
  • Brazil: Sao Paulo
  • Czech Republic: Prague
  • Denmark: Copenhagen
  • France: Bordeaux, Lyon (2), Lille, Marseille, Nantes, Nice, Paris (4), Strasbourg and Toulouse
  • Germany: Düsseldorf, Hamburg, Munich, Frankfurt
  • Hungary: Budapest
  • Israel: Tel Aviv
  • Italy: Milan (2), Rome, Turin
  • Luxembourg: Luxembourg
  • Netherlands: Amsterdam (2), Rotterdam
  • Portugal: Lisbon
  • Russia: Moscow
  • Spain: Barcelona (4), Madrid (2), Valencia
  • Sweden: Stockholm
  • Switzerland: Basle, Bern, Geneva, Lucerne, Lugano, Paudex (Lausanne), St. Gall, Zurich, Fribourg, Bienne, St. Moritz
  • UK: London (2)
  • USA: New York

Nespresso created a TV campaign with George Clooney in order to promote their premium brand. The clip also describes the rich taste of the blends and also shows what the luxurious interior of the exclusive Nespresso coffee boutiques is supposed to look like.

Serving customers mainly through their web page is a good strategic plan in order to provide their customers with the ultimate coffee experience. Having all traffic online allows Nespresso to have direct customer contact through emails or discussion boards, and also provides them with unique customer data access through membership (it is only possible to order capsules online if you join the Nespresso Club – which also forms a special connection with customers and opportunity to turn them into brand advocates) Such an amount of information offers excellent opportunities for database marketing and tailored sales strategies. By having the main service exchange online, Nespresso retain control of supply channels and hence, can assure high quality standards that build a premium corporate brand identity. In my opinion, certainly an interesting, very customer focused and successful business model.

Now then… I will have to be patient and allow three days until I receive the premium capsules in order to use my machine!